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Archive for October, 2013

Laurel Terrace

In July of this year we had a request from one of our visitors to Talk About Bletchley, see comment below:

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Michelle James

Please help, could anyone tell me where Laurel Terrace, Bletchley, was as my grandmother now 94 cant remember.

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This really was quite a challenge! The name most certainly sounded familiar, however hard we tried we could just not locate Laurel Terrace. We had a breakthrough when one of our visitors Rob Turnbull suggested it might be located just off the crossroads on the Shenley Road, this being within sight of The Shoulder of Mutton public house. Another of our regular visitors) to BCH (Pam Essam) found out its exact location from the Census Records, now we had to find a picture! Although it does not show the complete terrace it does show the end, if I recollect there were about six houses altogether in the terrace. As you see I’ve also included a map (Laurel Terrace is highlighted in red). On the photograph to the left of Chandler’s Stores can be seen the end of Laurel Terrace.

GJN P 006 Chandler's Shop Buckingham Road

I have included the original link so that visitors may read comments:

https://talkaboutbletchley.wordpress.com/2012/03/02/railway-terrace/

Sadly, as Rob Turnbull mentioned Laurel Terrace no longer remains, a block of flats now take up its location.

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Bletchley photos!

I’m sure that many of you have enjoyed a ‘refreshing pint’ in one of Bletchley and Fenny Stratford public houses, however did you also know that Bletchley had its own brewery?

The dray horse stands patiently outside the offices of Bletchley Brewery.

The dray horse stands patiently outside the offices of Bletchley Brewery.

If you zoom in on the photograph it’s interesting to note the wording on the barrels on the back of the dray, for those of you who have problems it says, CSB Cape Town; it does make you wonder if the barrels were destined to go overseas!

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Bletchley photos!

The location of the photograph will not I believe ‘tease’ anybody this time! However, I thought that you would like to see what the Temperance Hall in George Street looked like 121 years ago in 1892, the young children at the time seem very interested in the camera. The premises later became a Community Centre for the residents of Fenny Stratford and Bletchley, many of us over the years have enjoyed social and sporting events there; to enlarge the facilities of the Community Centre a hut was erected to the right of the ‘old hall’.

035 Temperance Hall, George St, 1892

Does anybody have any memories of the Community Centre?

 

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Don’t forget the Living Archive Down Memory Lane and exhibition on the First World War, Bletchley Library, 19 October 2013 from 12 noon to 3pm.

We’re looking for people with memorabilia or photos handed down from local families or found in the course of family history research.

Come along and see what we’ve collected and share your research.

From the early part of the War - note no US flag

From the early part of the War – note no US flag

 

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Bletchley photos!

Rowland Brothers traction engine on its way to the timber yard!

Rowland Brothers traction engine on its way to the timber yard!

Image reversed to correct view - see Rob Turnbull comment

Image reversed to correct view – see Rob Turnbull comment

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Bletchley Fly-over

Tin shops on Bletchley Road in the 1960s

Tin shops on Bletchley Road in the 1960s

 

This photograph was taken during the period between the building of the fly-over, and the construction of the new railway bridge,

The old railway bridge was filled in and became part of the embankment. The tin shops were demolished, and the road re-routed under the right hand span of the fly-over and through the new bridge.

 

 

 

 

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Changes on the Canal

Narrow Boats in Fenny Stratford Lock

Narrow Boats in Fenny Stratford Lock

The photograph above shows a barge (which is the motorised boat) and the butty  (which is the boat it tows), in the days when the canals were used by working boats.  They are travelling north, carrying their cargoes, possibly coal, up to Birmingham or beyond.

Now, most of the boats are converted to pleasure craft. Some of them are used as travelling shops, selling books, sweets and even walking sticks.

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